Walking the Wainwrights - Back o' Skiddaw

 
Two days after the Kentmere Horseshoe, this was a bit like "after the Lord Mayor's Show", or so I thought at the start.  But it was a marvellous, warm day, and we had a good, relatively short walk (6 miles) with enough uphill to make you think it was more than a stroll in the park.

Here are the pictures (you can click on any picture to get a larger version).



On our way!  Shirtsleeves order, as you can see from the couple ahead.  We are aiming round to the left - ahead are Bakestall and Knott, not for today.
Looking back down Trusmadoor (what a marvellous name!).  The three mounds are apparently drumlins from an erstwhile glacier.  Great Cockup is on the left.  No, I don't know how anyone managed to call it Great Cockup...


From the top of Great Cockup, looking towards Bakestall and Skiddaw.  The wind was really howling at this point - but it was still beautifully warm!  Most peculiar for the Lakes...
Looking down Trusmadoor from near the top of Great Cockup


Near the top of Meal Fell, which is just across Trusmadoor from Great Cockup.  You can see Binsey bedind Over Water.  This was the point at which I lost my A4 map: it had been folded into Stuart Marshall's book, which I was carrying in one hand. In trying to take a picture, the book slipped out of my hand and (did I mention that it was windy?) shot downhill at a great rate.  I charged after it and managed to corner it after about 100 yards - but the map was miles away by then...
Looking down Burntod Gill towards Bakestall and Skiddaw


The dogs at the top of Meal Fell, with Great Sca Fell in the background.
Little and Great Sca Fell.  Down here on the col there was no wind; up there it was different...


Just to prove we got there: the cairn at the top of Great Sca Fell, with Skiddaw in the distance.
Where we've been: Meal Fell in front of Great Cockup.
 

The cairn on Brae Fell.  I was trying to hold the camera straight, honest, but the wind won in the end...
Longlands Fell, the last on the round.  Sophie is getting as low as possible, to stop being blown away.  During the last 100 yards up to this lowly summit, I struggled along just like Scott of the Antarctic - except that it was warm!  I was in my shirtsleeves, and could hardly stand up.

Poor old Sophie - the things we do to our dogs...



This is the way back down to the car at Longlands Bridge.  I had met nobody the whole walk, but almost at the car a group of 20 emerged from the northern path on the right.  They thought it was "a bit windy, wasn't it?".


Cumbrian sights...

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